Childrens Guide

Introduction

It is important to consult a health care professional when seeking diagnosis and management of lactose intolerance in children, as it is essential that they continue to consume enough calcium to ensure healthy development.

We have developed advice for parents of lactose intolerant children, from babies to teenagers, with the help of our Lactofree® health experts.

BABIES TO 12 MONTHS

Babies will need breast milk or formula milk until they’re at least 12 months old. Cows’ milk is not suitable as a drink until a baby is a year old because it contains too much salt and protein, and not enough iron and other nutrients, to meet their needs. From six months, you can incorporate Lactofree® yogurt, soft white cheese and semi-hard cheese into weaning, just as you would with regular dairy.

 

12 MONTHS TO 2 YEARS

Between these ages, children can continue with breast or formula milk or they can begin to drink full fat real dairy without the lactose with Lactofree® whole dairy drink, along with Lactofree® yogurt and cheese, which offer all the taste and nutritional value of regular dairy.

 

2 YEARS TO 5 YEARS

From six years of age, health care professionals can give children a lactose breath test to diagnose their intolerance. They can also continue to enjoy the full range of Lactofree® products available.

 

TEENAGERS

A teenager is still growing and is at a very important time of their development particularly for bone health. Lactose intolerance should be diagnosed by a doctor and managed with the help of a dietitian to ensure their diet is balanced and sufficient for their nutritional needs.

 

GALACTOSAEMIA

Galactosaemia can be a dangerous condition that involves the inability to break down galactose, found in milk. Lactofree® dairy drink is made from regular cows’ milk, which is filtered to remove half the lactose, the remaining sugars are broken down into glucose and galactose which means it is not suitable for people who suffer from Galactosaemia.

 

COWS’ MILK ALLERGY

Immediate type allergy to cows’ milk – The immune system is sensitive to the protein in cows’ milk (casein) and causes potentially severe reactions such as hives, swelling and wheezing. Severe reactions are potentially life threatening. Treatment is complete avoidance of cows’ milk protein and therefore Lactofree® products (which still contain milk protein) are not suitable.

Delayed type allergy to cows’ milk – The immune system is sensitive to the protein in cows’ milk (casein) and causes delayed reactions, often causing chronic symptoms such as eczema, reflux or diarrhoea. Reactions are not life threatening but can be very unpleasant and may go undiagnosed for some time. Treatment is avoidance of cows’ milk protein and therefore Lactofree® products (which still contain milk protein) are not suitable.

This advice has been developed by the Lactofree® health experts.